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Blow the competition away! Drybar co-founder, Alli Webb, shares her advice for opening new locations and scaling your business.

I knew I was onto something with Drybar…

The day we opened our first shop in Brentwood, CA and there was a line out the door! The ladies were so excited and instantly loved the idea of getting a great blowout, in a beautiful space and at an affordable price. We never dreamed Drybar would turn into what is has, and I couldn’t be more grateful.

The biggest lesson learned in the first year of operations…

We learned pretty quickly that we could not do this on our own and needed to hire people much more experience than ourselves to help us scale the business. And, even more importantly, to never lose sight of how important our clients’ happiness is to our success!

How we maintain a consistent customer experience as we expand…

We spend a ton of time, attention and resources on training new and existing stylists and management to make sure clients have the same experience from location to location. It takes a lot of people to make that a reality, but we have an all-star team that I am extremely proud of. Also, it was important to create a family-like atmosphere where everyone feels vested and committed to the same cause.

The growth opportunities in my business are…

We still have a lot of shops to open and a lot of products and tools to develop. We just expanded to Canada, and over time will continue international expansion.

3 tips for generating excitement when opening in a new location…

It starts with creating a social buzz, engaging and involving our clients and employees, and getting people in the door to try our services. Then making sure they fall in love, and tell all their friends!

My vision for the future of Drybar…

For me, it’s all about making women look—and more importantly feel—amazing and confident. We will continue to strive for that in everything we ever do.

My best advice for entrepreneurs…

Don’t let perfect stand in the way of progress. Don’t be afraid to take a leap of faith on an idea you have! Just be sure to surround yourself with the right partners, who have the skills you lack.

Don’t let perfect stand in the way of progress.

My three signature strengths are…

  1. Hair! My technical skills, training and understanding of hair styling is the foundation that Drybar was built on, and remains a big differentiator for us.
  2. Finding great people. I think a big strength of mine and my brother’s—business partner Michael Landau—has been our ability to recognize all the stuff we’re not great at and finding really talented folks to lead those efforts and build the business.
  3. Decisiveness. Building a successful business requires thousands of decisions to be made daily. I like to think I’ve gotten pretty good at making decisions, both out of necessity and having recognized the importance of it. Sometimes my decisions are wrong, but I try to never let perfect get in the way of progress. And the only way to make progress is to make timely decisions!

Skills I developed as an entrepreneur that weren’t always natural to me…

To listen to feedback, including negative feedback. It definitely hurts a lot, but it’s incredibly important for your company’s growth, development and longevity.

Tools I use to motivate my team to achieve and surpass our goals…

I’m a big advocate of having fun! Life is too short to be someplace lame, which is one of Drybar’s 10 core values. I’m also really big on giving positive feedback to my team as often as possible. I believe positive reinforcement goes a very long way in making people feel appreciated.

How I set and track personal goals…

I mostly have a mental checklist of things to get done, big and small. Because I’m on the go so much, I keep lists on my iPhone and will refer back to them, usually when I’m flying, which is quite often. It’s a quiet moment when I can reflect on what I’ve gotten done, what needs tweaking or what may require more time and focus.

My motto is…

Treat others as you would want to be treated. You never know what someone else is going through.