Marketing

Email marketing is one of the best ways to keep in touch with customers. It’s cost effective and, if done properly, can help build brand awareness and loyalty. In addition, response rates on email marketing are generally higher than for traditional mail.

Another benefit of email marketing is the demographic information that customers provide when signing up for your email newsletter. Discovering exactly who your customers are—how old they are, what their interests are, what region of the country they reside in—can help you tailor your products and services to best suit their needs.

If you’re ready to ready to create your email newsletter, ask yourself the following questions before you begin:

Should I use HTML or Plain Text?

Response rates for HTML newsletters are generally far higher than plain text, and graphics and colors tend to make the publications look far more professional. The downside is that HTML email is slower to download, and some email providers may screen out HTML email.

What incentive, if any, am I providing consumers?

To get customers to sign up for your newsletter, advertise the benefits of receiving your newsletter, such as helpful tips, informative content or early notification of special offers or campaigns.

Am I going the extra mile?

Many studies suggest that email newsletters are read far more carefully when they offer information that is useful to the customers’ lives rather than merely selling products and services. Helpful tips, engaging content and humor are often expected to accompany email newsletters.

Did I ask too many questions?

Each demographic question you ask may reduce the number of customers signing up; therefore, it’s best to limit the amount of information you solicit or give customers the option of skipping the questionnaire.

the U.S. Small Business Administration

About the Author


the U.S. Small Business Administration


The United States Small Business Administration (SBA) is a government agency that provides support to entrepreneurs and small businesses. The mission of the Small Business Administration is "to maintain and strengthen the nation's economy by enabling the establishment and viability of small businesses and by assisting in the economic recovery of communities after disasters". The agency's activities are summarized as the "3 Cs" of capital, contracts and counseling.